Tag Archives: Library of Congress

Links We Love Weekly Round-Up — June 29, 2015

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The Key to Leadership: Empathy

You can tell a lot about a person by how they run their meetings. Inviting the correct people and creating clear agendas are just the beginning. But are they also demonstrating emotional intelligence? Are they making eye contact and actually paying attention, positively contributing to the conversation in a meaningful way? If we really want to improve how people work together at meetings (and by extension, in the entire organization), we need to develop and rely on our key emotional intelligence competency: empathy.

Why It’s Time to Forget the Pecking Order at Work

Organizations are often run according to “the superchicken model,” where the value is placed on star employees who outperform others. And yet, this isn’t what drives the most high-achieving teams. Business leader Margaret Heffernan observes that it is social cohesion — built every coffee break, every time one team member asks another for help — that leads over time to great results. It’s a radical rethink of what drives us to do our best work, and what it means to be a leader. Because as Heffernan points out: “Companies don’t have ideas. Only people do.”

Watering the Flowers

You’ve probably heard of the 20/60/20 Leadership Rule that divides people based on change-receptiveness. Harvard Business School classifies people based on performance levels: top performers, strong performers, and underachievers.  As humans, we have an innate tendency to categorize people and things into groups to help us make sense of the world. How we view our people… meaning those we serve at our respective firms… is no different.

What Lawyers Can Learn From Uber

Over the last few weeks I’ve had a number of terrible experiences with traditional taxicabs. While I usually use Uber or other ride-sharing services when I travel for work, I used traditional taxis a few times recently for a variety of reasons.  Never again!  Nearly every taxi ride was laughably bad, especially when compared to the convenience of Uber. Here’s what happened and how this relates to lawyers.

Judge’s Top 10 Tips for Winning Cases

Here’s the secret for lawyers to win all of their cases: Don’t take losers.  That’s the first nugget of advice from a state district judge who shared a top 10 list for lawyers to win their cases during the State Bar of Texas Annual Meeting on June 18.

The Trick to Being a Prolific Scholar

You don’t have to wake up at 5 a.m. to be a prolific scholar. You do have to write however. And nearly all of the prolific academics I have met are daily writers. Daily writing is one of the most important strategies I can recommend to boost your productivity.

YouTube Teams Up with Storyful to Create Curated Newswire

YouTube announced YouTube Newswire, a partnership with Storyful to provide a curated news feed with verified stories. According to the official blog, this grew out of the proliferation of user-generated YouTube videos that are already being used to support news reporting.

4 Entrepreneurs Trying to Bring Cloud Computing to Tech-Leery Law Firms

While cloud computing has penetrated virtually every sector of today’s economy, the legal world has remained a stubborn last bastion of old school, on-premise technology. Until now, few entrepreneurs have dared to attack this bulwark of backward, cloud-wary client-server thinking.  Fortunately for today’s legal professionals, technology entrepreneurs are innovators, always looking for ways to make life easier for their customers. We’ve identified four entrepreneurs in the vanguard of this new legal cloud—bringing the promise and potential of the cloud to the world of law.

Amazon to Pay Authors in Its Library Program by Pages Read

In a move that places a new priority on ‘page-turner,’ Amazon on July 1 will begin paying authors in its Kindle library program by the number of pages read, and not the number of times a book is checked out.

Finding a Librarian of Congress for the Digital Age

After nearly 28 years of service, Librarian of Congress James Hadley Billington announced his retirement on June 10, 2015, which becomes effective on Jan. 1, 2016. President Barack Obama is tasked with finding a replacement, who will then need to be confirmed by the Senate.

The Ubiquitous Librarian: A Flurry of Final Posts

Brian Mathews of the Ubiquitous Librarian announced in late May that he would be ending his blog in 50 days.  Click to read some of these finale posts, including “What did librarians want in 1945?  Many of the same things we want today.”, “Could Your Library Answer 1 Million Reference Questions a Year?”, “Scientific Utopia: Improving the Openness and Reproducibility of Research”, and “From Teaching to Consulting: Librarians as Information Literacy Designers. An Interview with Carrie Donovan.”

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Links We Love Weekly Round-Up — June 8, 2015

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The Evolving & Expanding Service Landscape Across Academic Libraries

Libraries are as robust as ever. We may be answering fewer traditional questions, but collectively we are involved across many more components of the academic enterprise.

Pronouncing Dictionary of the Supreme Court of the United States

Although the United States is famously a nation of immigrants, Americans often struggle with the pronunciation of foreign words and names. Mispronunciation of even common foreign words is ubiquitous (Eye-rack and Eye-ran spring to mind). Foreign names in legal matters present a particular challenge for legal professionals. The purpose of the Pronouncing Dictionary of United States Supreme Court cases is to help conscientious lawyers, judges, teachers, students, and journalists correctly pronounce often-perplexing case names.

Run Android on Your Windows Tablet – DuOS-M

I use two tablets. My main computer is a Windows 8.1 tablet that runs just about every program I use, and have used for years, to run my practice. However, while a tablet, I prefer the content display programs of my Samsung Android tablet.

Wrongfully Imprisoned Man Gains Law Degree

Jarrett Adams was wrongfully convicted of sexual assault at age 17 and sentence to 28 years in a maximum security prison. After serving nearly ten years, Jarrett was exonerated with the assistance of the Wisconsin Innocence Project at the University of Wisconsin Law School.

Using “Undo Send” in Gmail to Stop Inappropriate Emails from Going Out

Email should always have an undo button. It is far too easy to send out an angry or ill-advised email, particularly when our natural inclination to advocate for and protect our clients gets the better of our common sense and decency. Fortunately, if you are a Gmail user, the undo button is built-in.

Law Is the Least Diverse Profession in the Nation. And Lawyers Aren’t Doing Enough to Change That.

Lawyers are leading the push for equality. But they need to focus on their own profession.

 BEA’s New Data Tool Provides Fast Access to Trade and Investment Stats for Countries

A new data tool–International Trade and Investment Country Facts Application–on the Bureau of Economic Analysis website gives users a snapshot of statistics on trade and investment between the United States and another country by simply clicking on a world map.

A New Interface and New Web Archive Content at Loc.gov

Recently the Library of Congress launched a significant amount of new Web Archive content on the Library’s Web site, as a part of a continued effort to integrate the Library’s Web Archives into the rest of the loc.gov web presence.

Top Five Inanimate Objects to Use as Your Lawyer

A man in Colorado brought a stuffed owl to court with him as his lawyer. According to news reports, the owl’s name is Solomon, and it was “just sitting in” until a public defender was assigned to the man’s case. Although the owl claimed to have law degrees from Yale, Harvard, and Stanford, it is unclear just how effective Solomon was in the courtroom. Still, this highly credentialed advocate probably charged a much lower hourly rate than your average lawyer. If you are considering hiring a lawyer and are wondering whether an inanimate object may better serve your needs, consider these alternatives.

Conformity vs. Scrutiny: Radical Information Literacy. An interview with Andrew Whitworth

Here is a quick interview with Andrew Whitworth, Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at the University of Manchester and Programme Director of the MA: Digital Technologies, Communication and Education. He published Radical Information Literacy: Reclaiming the Political Heart of the IL Movement.

Employee performance reviews: productive or destructive?

Could your performance reviews be demotivating your employees?

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The 50th Anniversary of The Civil Rights Act of 1964

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In case you are visiting Washington, DC in the coming year, plan a visit to the Library of Congress’ new exhibit “The Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom.” The exhibit which recognizes the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is open to the public Monday-Saturday 8:30 am- 4:30 pm until September 12, 2015.

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 (PL 88-352, 78 Stat. 241, enacted July 2, 1964) outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin.  It provided injunctive relief against discrimination in public accommodations and segregation in public education. It enforced the constitutional right to vote, ending unequal voter-registration requirements. The law is a landmark piece of civil rights legislation.

The Library of Congress’ free exhibit “The Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom” highlights the legal and legislative challenges and victories leading to its passage. The exhibit highlights the individuals, both prominent leaders and private citizens, who participated in the process. The exhibit contains more than 200 items from correspondence to photographs, newspapers, legal briefs, drawings and posters. It also includes audio-video stations throughout the exhibit showing film clips of dramatic events related to the civil rights era such as protests, sit-ins, boycotts and other public actions. An introductory film narrated by Julian Bond focuses on the significance of the legislation.  Another video explores the impact of the Civil Rights Act. There are six themes in the exhibit: Prologue, Segregation Era, World War II and the Post War Years, Civil Rights Era, Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Impact.

Much of the exhibit’s documentation comes from NAACP Records in the Library’s Manuscript Division and the Prints and Photographs Division. The audio-visual materials come from the Library’s American Folklife Center’s Civil Rights History Project and the Library’s National Audio-Visual Conservation Center.  Newman’s Own Foundation with additional support from HISTORY® provided funding for the exhibition. Further details about the exhibit can be found at http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/civil-rights-act/

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~Betty Thomas~

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Links We Love Weekly Round-Up — March 17, 2014

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Want a Better Work/Life Balance?  How to Spend More Time Chilling When You’re Done Billing

As any practicing lawyer learns within about a week of beginning her career, the concept of the work/life balance is sort of a fiction. Practically speaking, there simply aren’t enough hours in the day to achieve any sort of actual, equal balance between your life and your work.

SCOTUSblog Internship

The principal focus of the internship (which is a paid one) will be assisting Tom with the “Petition of the day” and “Petitions to watch” features on the blog and maintaining the case pages. This will require roughly ten to twenty hours of work a week on a flexible work schedule, which can be accomplished remotely.  The position will begin in April, and the expected commitment would be through December 2014.

Historians Unravel the Mystery of Cryptic Lincoln Note

Historians believe they’ve unraveled the mystery of a cryptic note Lincoln penned that doesn’t identify the recipient by name and has a section clipped out. Researchers at the Papers of Abraham Lincoln project concluded Lincoln was writing to an ally to ask him to maintain a secret relationship with a political insider during the 1860 election campaign. Lincoln asked his cohort to “keep up a correspondence” with the person. The use of that phrase gave researchers their best clue. They ran it through a searchable database they are compiling of Lincoln’s papers and found several matches.

IRS Produces YouTube Video for Same-Sex Couples

The Internal Revenue Service has created a new video for YouTube that aims to provide useful tax tips for married same-sex couples.  The video is the latest addition to the IRS’s YouTube channel containing short instructional videos covering more than 100 topics, ranging from tips for victims of identity theft to taking advantage of the new simplified home office deduction. The videos have been viewed more than 5 million times.

Why Edward Snowden Chose SXSW for His First Live Video Appearance

Edward Snowden isn’t ready to come back to the U.S. in person yet, but on Monday, he will be here virtually. The NSA whistleblower will be on a South by Southwest panel with his lawyer, Ben Wizner, and ACLU technologist Chris Soghoian. Every news network in the world is salivating for a one-on-one interview with Snowden, but he instead chose to talk to a room full of technophiles in Austin.

Magna Carta is Coming to the Library of Congress

Today, the Library of Congress announced officially that Magna Carta is coming to the Library!  Lincoln Cathedral inLincoln, England, is loaning the Library its exemplification of a 1215 King John Magna Carta.  The historical document will be part of the exhibition, Magna Carta: Muse and Mentor, which opens November 6, 2014 and continues through January 19, 2015.  The Law Library’s very own Nathan Dorn is the curator for the exhibition.

12 Historic Bars Every Book Nerd Needs to Visit

Channel your inner literary lush by drinking where the greats drank.

U-M Law Student Diana Peloquin Talks about Her Win on ‘Jeopardy!’

U-M law and social work grad student Diana Peloquin played David to “Jeopardy!”‘s most recent incarnation of Goliath, 11 time champion Arthur Chu, on an episode that aired Wednesday night.

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Law Day 2013 – Realizing the Dream: Equality for All

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May 1st is Law Day, a national day to celebrate the rule of law and its contributions to the freedoms that Americans enjoy. The day also provides an opportunity to recognize the role of courts and in our democracy and the importance of jury service.  In 1957, Charles S. Rhyne, President of the American Bar Association lobbied for a day to celebrate our legal system.  President Dwight Eisenhower established by proclamation the first Law Day in 1958 to mark the nation’s commitment to the rule of law. In 1961, Congress issued a joint resolution designating May 1 as the official date for celebrating Law Day, which is subsequently codified (U.S. Code, Title 36, Section 113). Every president since then has issued a Law Day proclamation on May 1 to celebrate the nation’s commitment to the rule of law.

Law Day programs are designed to help people understand how the law keeps us free and how our legal system strives to achieve justice. These programs are conducted by various groups including local bar associations, courts, law libraries and schools. For example, the Library of Congress will be holding a panel discussion on the movement for civil and human rights in America. Carrie Johnson, Justice Correspondent for National Public Radio will be moderating the discussion.

This year’s theme “Realizing the Dream: Equality for All” provides an opportunity to explore the movement for civil and human rights in America and the impact it has had in promoting the ideal of equality under the law.  This year marks the 150th anniversary of the issuance of the Emancipation Proclamation, handwritten by Abraham Lincoln to end slavery in the United States and promote the idea of freedom and equality for all men. This year also marks the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech.  The Civil Rights Movement brought progress in eliminating discrimination based on race, religion, gender, ethnicity, national origin, age, disability and sexual orientation. This year’s Law Day provides an opportunity to focus on the work that still needs to be done to ensure equality for all.

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~Betty Thomas~

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