Tag Archives: Betty Thomas

Sunday Student Access to the Charlotte Law Library

 

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Hours

The Charlotte School of Law Library is open on Sundays from 1 pm to 10 pm.

The Library User Experience (LUX) Desk is open from 2 pm to 8 pm.

Reference Services are provided by a librarian from 2 pm to 6 pm.

Access

Getting in. All the entrances to the building are locked on Sundays. To get in, there is a badge reader on the wall outside the College Street entrance near the revolving doors. Swipe your card to get into the building.

Getting out. To leave the building, there is red button to push located on the wall between the glass doors on the College Street entrance/exit.

If anyone has a problem getting into the building, there is a button at the badge reader that connects to Security. Please do not let other people into the building. These measures are for your safety.

~Betty Thomas~

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Know Your Law Library: East Reading Room

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On the east side of the 5th floor of the library (nearest to 4th Street) is the East Reading Room. Last week several bookcases and display shelves and journals and furniture were moved to create a new reading room for the library.  There are also electrical outlets at the base of  the windows. Doesn’t it look inviting?

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The current periodical shelving was dismantled and moved to the East Reading Room so that everyone now has a comfortable place to sit and read their favorite journal, magazine or newspaper.

The law library also plans to continue hosting professors speaking on their favorite topics during monthly Coffee Talks. In the coming weeks, the fiction collection and the leadership book collections will also be relocated to this area of the library.

Thanks to everyone who helped create this great space over the past few weeks.

Come check it out!                        

~Betty Thomas~

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Fall 2015 LUX Desk Hours

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~Betty Thomas~

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The 50th Anniversary of The Civil Rights Act of 1964

With less than a month left on the Library of Congress’ exhibit “The Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom”, it seemed appropriate to remind everyone who may be traveling to D.C. in the next few weeks that it’s their last chance to view this exhibit, which recognizes the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 .  This post originally ran in November of 2014.  
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In case you are visiting Washington, DC in the coming year, plan a visit to the Library of Congress’ new exhibit “The Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom.” The exhibit which recognizes the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is open to the public Monday-Saturday 8:30 am- 4:30 pm until September 12, 2015.

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 (PL 88-352, 78 Stat. 241, enacted July 2, 1964) outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin.  It provided injunctive relief against discrimination in public accommodations and segregation in public education. It enforced the constitutional right to vote, ending unequal voter-registration requirements. The law is a landmark piece of civil rights legislation.

The Library of Congress’ free exhibit “The Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom” highlights the legal and legislative challenges and victories leading to its passage. The exhibit highlights the individuals, both prominent leaders and private citizens, who participated in the process. The exhibit contains more than 200 items from correspondence to photographs, newspapers, legal briefs, drawings and posters. It also includes audio-video stations throughout the exhibit showing film clips of dramatic events related to the civil rights era such as protests, sit-ins, boycotts and other public actions. An introductory film narrated by Julian Bond focuses on the significance of the legislation.  Another video explores the impact of the Civil Rights Act. There are six themes in the exhibit: Prologue, Segregation Era, World War II and the Post War Years, Civil Rights Era, Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Impact.

Much of the exhibit’s documentation comes from NAACP Records in the Library’s Manuscript Division and the Prints and Photographs Division. The audio-visual materials come from the Library’s American Folklife Center’s Civil Rights History Project and the Library’s National Audio-Visual Conservation Center.  Newman’s Own Foundation with additional support from HISTORY® provided funding for the exhibition. Further details about the exhibit can be found at http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/civil-rights-act/

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~Betty Thomas~

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Leading From Where You Are

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“Stand up if you are a leader of anything,” was Kate Irwin-Smiler’s opening to the session. Of course, the question quickly raised by someone in the audience was whether our leadership was in our own estimation or whether it was based on our title. (Lots of laughter here.) Then she asked us to sit down and those who are followers stand. This interactive exercise led into Kate Irwin-Smiler, Reference Librarian at Wake Forest University School of Law and Sara Sampson, Assistant Dean for Information Services & Law Library Director at Ohio State Moritz College of Law’s presentation “Leading from Where You Are.”  Both women talked about how they are leaders and followers. Sara Sampson pointed out that although she has a traditional leadership title, she is still a follower as she follows more experienced deans and the dean of the law school who is also a leader and a follower. They pointed out that being a good follower can give you the skills to become a good leader.

What is a leader?

People who think creatively and are passionate about what they do. People who think about problems and work to fix problems. – AALL Leadership Academy 2014

People who realize you have to work through other people to achieve results. They bring people together to make things happen. – The Introverted Leader

Sampson found that there are lots of different definitions of leadership and those who write about leadership do not agree. Some believe leaders are born with certain traits that help them become leaders and others define leadership by what they do: they innovate, they take charge, and they make decisions. She concluded there are many ways to be a leader and the definition needs to be broadened.

Different Types of Leaders

Even official, formal leaders like the President of the United States or our AALL Board cannot be effective unless they have followers.

Then there are leaders like those in Selma who stood up to the leaders with official powers of the state and they got some of their objectives accomplished.

Sandra Day O’Connor was a trail blazing leader. Just by her presence on the court, she led the way for other woman to be on the Supreme Court. She had to do her job and do it well for others to follow.

Rosalind Franklin whose work on the structure of DNA was overshadowed by others in her field was a leader too in that she continued with her work despite lack of recognition. She was a thought leader.

Pope Francis is a leader, not only because he is head of the Catholic Church but because he is quietly keeping the focus on issues like poverty over a long period of time.

The Pope, Mahatma Gandhi and many in the law library profession are servant leaders.

The facilitating leaders of our profession make connections between people with needs and resources. These people are often quiet leaders who are integral to the success of an organization.

Collaborative/negotiating leaders work across departments or across the university.

Mentoring and sponsoring leaders not only advise mentees but also give critical, honest feedback, make connections, open doors at higher levels so that the mentee can succeed.

A cheerleader leads by touting other’s success, showing how important their work is to the organization.

How Library Staff Can Lead In Your Library… a Brainstorm List

  • Managing programs
  • Chairing committees
  • Trusting others to do their job
  • Giving people what they need
  • Using creativity
  • Teaching
  • Facilitating opportunities
  • Using different language that does not diminish what we do
  • Bridging the gap between the library and other departments
  • Participating in teams
  • Providing institutional knowledge to others
  • Raising issues that need to be addressed
  • Identifying problems and proposing solutions

How to Be a Responsible Follower

Whether or not you choose to be a leader, here are ways of being a responsible follower:

  • Managing up
  • Engaging at work
  • Being prepared and participating in meetings
  • Sharing ideas in a respectful way
  • Leading yourself and your reactions
  • Being willing to do what others will not
  • Investing in work relationships
  • Lightening the leader’s load
  • Thinking about what people will need and having it ready in advance
  • Knowing when to push for your ideas and when to let go
  • Realizing that dissent is a gift

“Be Better Tomorrow Than You Are Today”

Further Reading

Sara Sampson and Kate Irwin-Smiler shared their bibliography:

  • Fillipa Marullo Anzalone, Servant Leadership: A New Model of Law Library Leaders, 99 Law Library J. 793 (2007).
  • Shirley K. Baker, Leading from Below: Or, Risking Getting Fired, 9 Library Administration & Management 238 (1985).
  • Robert K. Greenleaf, The Servant as Leader (rev. ed. 1991).
  • Marc Hurwitz and Samantha Hurwitz, Leadership is Half the Story: A Fresh Look at Followership, Leadership, and Collaboration (2015).
  • Jennifer B. Kahnweiler, The Introverted Leader (2013).
  • Martha Lagace, “The Quiet Leader & How to Be One,” Working Knowledge http:hbswk.hbs.edu/item/2766.html (Feb 11, 2002).
  • John C. Maxwell, The 360° Leader: Developing Your Influence from Anywhere in the Organization (2005).
  • Peter Guy Northouse, Leadership Theory & Practice (2004).
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Betty Thomas with the Lincolns at the Opening Reception

~Betty Thomas~

This article was featured in the Spring 2015 issue of the Southeastern Law Librarian, the official newsletter of the Southeastern Chapter of the American Association of Law Libraries.  It is reprinted here with permission.

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