Category Archives: Of Interest to Law Students

Coffee and Sidebar in the Library with Professors Sigman and Huber

Coffee Talk October Print

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by | September 17, 2015 · 8:00 am

Announcement: 2016 Writing Competition for American College of Consumer Financial Services Lawyers

clip art man with pencil

The American College of Consumer Financial Services Lawyers is pleased to announce awards to be presented for:

(a) the best book
(b) the best publishable article, book chapter, or substantial book review
(c) the best student note or comment on a topic dealing with consumer financial services law.

The awards include cash payments of $2500, $2000, and $1000, respectively, a Certificate of Recognition from the College, and travel expenses to attend the Spring 2016 meeting of the College. In any given year, depending on submissions, all three awards, or fewer, may be made.

Eligible entries will address a topic on consumer financial services, but not securities regulation, insurance, or the safety-and-soundness aspects of banking regulation. Works on subjects within these (or other) areas, however, will be considered if they bear directly on consumer financial services.

Entries must have been written or published between November 15, 2014, and December 1, 2015. The deadline for submission is December 1, 2015. Unpublished entries should be typed, double spaced, and in law review format.

The winners will be honored at the annual meeting of the College held in conjunction with the Spring Meeting of the Business Law Section of the American Bar Association, to be held in Montreal in April 2016.

The American College of Consumer Financial Services Lawyers is a nonprofit association of attorneys who have made significant contributions to consumer financial services law over an extended period of time. Its members include academics, present and former federal and state regulatory and enforcement officers, authors in the field, private practitioners, counsel for financial institutions and other service providers, and representatives of consumer protection and advocacy organizations.

To learn more, click here for the official Competition Announcement.

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Need a Break? The Library Can Help with Our Legal Themed Movie Collection!

Recently, we had one of our student workers scan through previous blog content and choose a few of the ones she found most helpful as a current Charlotte Law student.  We’ll be re-posting this content throughout the summer so it’s readily available to all of our incoming and returning students for Fall of 2015.  This post originally ran in March of 2015.


In 2012, we blogged about the 25 greatest legal movies of all time and took a poll as to which movies our students preferred most.

This time we are reposting the 2008 ABA Journal listing which featured 25 of the best legal movies and we’ve added hyperlinks to the records in our own library catalog.  Take a look and see what’s available.  We might have something that will help you make the most of your relaxation time over Spring Break!

  1. To kill a mockingbird [videorecording]
  2. 12 angry men [videorecording]
  3. My cousin Vinny [videorecording]
  4. Anatomy of a murder [videorecording]
  5. Inherit the wind [videorecording]
  6. Witness for the prosecution : [DVD]
  7. Erin Brockovich [videorecording]
  8. The verdict [videorecording]
  9. Presumed innocent [videorecording]
  10. Judgment at Nuremberg [videorecording]
  11. A man for all seasons [videorecording]
  12. A Few good men [videorecording]
  13. Chicago [videorecording]
  14. Kramer vs. Kramer [videorecording]
  15. The paper chase [videorecording]
  16. Reversal of fortune [videorecording]
  17. Compulsion [videorecording]
  18. And justice for all [videorecording]
  19. In the name of the father [videorecording]
  20. A civil action [videorecording]
  21. Amistad [videorecording]
  22. Miracle on 34th Street [videorecording]

Honorable Mentions

  • THE ACCUSED (1988) Jodie Foster is a woman who is gang-raped in a bar and, when the rapists go free, goads a reluctant prosecutor to pursue the patrons who urged them on. The accused [videorecording]
  • ADAM’S RIB (1949) George Cukor’s mannered comedy, with Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn as married lawyers who oppose each other in court. Adam’s rib [videorecording]
  • BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT (1956) Dana Andrews is a writer who sets himself up on a murder rap to reveal the shortcomings of circum­stantial evidence.
  • THE CAINE MUTINY (1954) Humphrey Bogart is riveting in this adaptation of Herman Wouk’s complex novel about military authority and moral duty. The Caine mutiny [videorecording]
  • CLASS ACTION (1991) A father and daughter clash in and outside the courtroom as they square off in a volatile product liability case. Class action [videorecording]
  • THE CLIENT (1994) Susan Sarandon is an underwhelming lawyer who finds herself representing a young boy who has witnessed a Mafia hit. The Client [videorecording]
  • COUNSELLOR AT LAW (1933) John Barrymore is a workaholic lawyer who is in danger of losing his family in this William Wyler film.
  • THE COURT-MARTIAL OF BILLY MITCHELL (1955) Otto Preminger directs Gary Cooper in this tale of the real-life maverick general who thinks an airplane can sink a ship—and is court-martialed for proving it. The Court-martial of Billy Mitchell [videorecording]
  • THE DEVIL’S ADVOCATE (1997) A new attorney introduced into the world’s most powerful law firm discovers that its managing partner is morally challenged. Devil’s advocate [videorecording]
  • THE FIRM (1993) Tom Cruise is recruited by a prestigious law firm that he gradually learns has a very sinister background. The Firm [videorecording]
  • THE FORTUNE COOKIE (1966) Walter Matthau and Jack Lemmon romp in this Billy Wilder comedy about a sleazy lawyer who talks a relative into feigning injury for the sake of a lawsuit.
  • GHOSTS OF MISSISSIPPI (1996) The true story of efforts to bring to justice Byron De La Beckwith for the 30-year-old murder of civil rights activist Medgar Evers. Ghosts of Mississippi [videorecording]
  • INTOLERABLE CRUELTY (2003) The Coen brothers reveal their take on divorce law. George Clooney is at his toothy best.
  • JAGGED EDGE (1985) Defense attorney Glenn Close gets close to a client, played by Jeff Bridges, who is on trial for the murder of his heiress wife. Jagged edge [videorecording]
  • JFK (1991) Oliver Stone takes on New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison’s efforts to solve the Kennedy assassination. History yields to riveting storytelling.
  • LEGALLY BLONDE (2001) Reese Witherspoon became one of the most sought-after actresses in Hollywood after ridiculing the elitism of Harvard Law. Legally blonde [videorecording]
  • LIAR, LIAR (1997) A hilarious vehicle for Jim Carrey, who plays a lawyer who finds he is physically incapable of telling a fib. Liar liar [videorecording]
  • MICHAEL CLAYTON (2007) George Clooney shines in this look at the dark underbelly of big-firm law. Michael Clayton [videorecording]
  • MUSIC BOX (1989) Hungarian immigrant Mike Laszlo, accused of being a war criminal, asks his daughter (Jessica Lange) to defend him in court. She learns more about him than she wants to know.
  • NORTH COUNTRY (2005) It’s one wom­an against the system: The extra­ordinary Charlize Theron plays a miner who sues the company. North country [videorecording]
  • THE PELICAN BRIEF (1993) A law stu­dent discovers a plot to assassinate U.S. Supreme Court justices in this John Grisham adaptation. The pelican brief [videorecording]
  • THE PEOPLE VS. LARRY FLYNT (1996) Cameos abound in this portrayal of the trial of the renowned porn publisher. The people vs. Larry Flynt [videorecording]
  • PRIMAL FEAR (1996) Richard Gere is the attorney and Edward Norton a young altar boy accused of killing a priest in a story whose plot twists and turns. Primal fear DVD 126 [videorecording]
  • THE RAINMAKER (1997) Another John Grisham lawyer fights the system, this time with Matt Damon starring and Francis Ford Coppola directing. John Grisham’s The rainmaker [videorecording]
  • A TIME TO KILL (1996) An earnest retelling of the Grisham novel about a racially charged killing in the Deep South. Matthew McConaughey and Sandra Bullock spark. A time to kill [videorecording]

~Jane Fraytet~

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Charlotte School of Law: Unlocking Human Potential

Recently, we had one of our student workers scan through previous blog content and choose a few of the ones she found most helpful as a current Charlotte Law student.  We’ll be re-posting this content throughout the summer so it’s readily available to all of our incoming and returning students for Fall of 2015.  This post originally ran in March of 2015.

The Charlotte School of Law has an overriding purpose: to unlock human potential. Our immediate task is to educate students, in particular so that they can succeed in law school, on the bar examination, and in their chosen careers. But we carry out our educational activities with an eye toward the larger purpose. We identify students who have the potential to learn and succeed more broadly and we tailor comprehensive programs to build on that potential. Thus, we have a growing Honors Program; a large Student Success department; wellness counselors; programs to engender grit, self-awareness, and professionalism; and so much more.

I came to Charlotte as Dean two years ago, in large part because of the commitment to unlocking human potential. (This is a very fundamental commitment; we are also committed to unlocking the potential of our faculty and staff.) I also came for our commitment to the unceasing improvement of our programs, services, and outcomes. No person is or ever will be perfect, but every person can become better and better in personal and professional ways. In the same way, no organization is or ever will be perfect. But the more the organization understands the need for constant improvement, the better it can be in providing value, satisfaction, and success for the persons it serves.

Continuous improvement in law schools is more important today than it was even ten years ago. It is also more difficult. Legal education has long been premised on assumptions about what colleges teach and assess in the areas of writing, critical reading, and personal management; on what students teach themselves; on the nature of jobs in the legal services field; on what employers look for in graduates; and on what bar examiners test. Many of these assumptions are no longer wholly valid. Other changes in the environment are equally dramatic. Nationally, the number of applicants to law school has been declining for five years. Nationally, first-time bar passage rates have been declining (for reasons that are not clear). And both law and legal education are becoming increasingly internationalized, with respect to students, programs, and services. For law schools, adaptation and improvement is essential.

The Charlotte School of Law is continually addressing these challenges and is ever alert to opportunities. For example, we systematically concern ourselves with writing skills. We are currently developing methods for rigorously assessing writing competency and potential for improvement in applicants; expanding our introductory writing program; increasing the ongoing assessment of writing in doctrinal courses; and proving added support for student who need enrichment. Similarly, we are in the midst of a comprehensive project to strengthen the development of competencies required for success on the bar examination. This project reaches from the beginning of the first year through the day of the bar examination itself. We are expanding our opportunities for pro bono service, both in Charlotte and around the world. For example, this month we are launching a new project of pro bono service for our students in Haiti. We are also alert to changes in the legal services field. For example, this summer we are starting a new program in corporate compliance that will provide both knowledge and competitive advantage in this rapidly growing field. And there is much, much more.

I have been Dean of three law schools. One of my greatest sources of satisfaction is improving the school and its services, and enabling faculty and staff to make contributions that are both valuable to students and meaningful to the faculty and staff members themselves. The Charlotte School of Law is an extraordinary place for students to learn and grow, and to position themselves to navigate change. What makes it such an extraordinary place is not only the deep and pervasive commitment to unlocking potential, but also the deep and pervasive commitment to doing a continually better job of providing programs, services, and resources that enable that potential to be unlocked.

~Jay Conison (Dean), Charlotte School of Law~

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North Carolina Judicial Branch — Government Jobs Available Now


Are you looking for a government job that will help reduce the amount of money you must pay the government for your student loans? The following resources might help you locate a state job in North Carolina, and listed below are six NC state jobs that are available now.

How about a career with the North Carolina Judicial Branch of state government! Did you know that the Judicial Branch:

  • Employs over 6,500 people.
  • Has positions in every county in the state.
  • Depends on people with a wide range of skills and abilities to make the Judicial Branch function including:
    • Assistant and Deputy Clerks of Court – Process, control and maintain documentation of court cases.
    • Victim and Witness Legal Assistants – Support prosecutors by providing administrative support, assisting victims and processing and preparing documents.
    • Court Support Personnel – Support judges by tracking cases, preparing court calendars and responding to public inquires.
    • Assistant District Attorneys – Prosecute all classes of criminal cases from infractions to felonies.
    • Magistrates – Adjudicate legal matters involving small claims (less than $5,000) and conduct preliminary matters in criminal case such as setting bail.
    • Computer Technologists – Develop and support technical solutions to meet court workload.
  • Has a budget of over $450 million.
  • Processes over 3 million cases per year.

The Judicial Branch Mission: To protect and preserve the rights and liberties of all the people, as guaranteed by the Constitutions and laws of the United States and North Carolina by providing a fair, independent and accessible forum for the just, timely and economical resolution of their legal affairs.

To learn more about these government positions and how to apply for a legal job with the NC Courts go to their website or contact them at

Listed below are several jobs that are currently listed with the North Carolina Judicial Branch of state government:

Appellate Defender Indigent Defense Services Durham County Permanent Full-Time $121,737.00 Annually 06/26/15
Assistant District Attorney District Attorney Catawba County Permanent Full-Time $38,628.00 – $72,797.00 Annually 06/08/15
Assistant District Attorney District Attorney Robeson County Permanent Full-Time $38,628.00 – $72,797.00 Annually 06/08/15
Attorney II – Workers’ Compensation Dept of Justice Wake County Permanent Full-Time $65,459.00 – $109,068.00 Annually 06/05/15
NEW! Director Administrative Office of the Courts Wake County Permanent Full-Time $128,259.00 Annually 09/03/15
Magistrate District Court Forsyth County Permanent Full-Time $35,275.00 – $47,550.00 Annually 06/04/15


If you follow this link, you can find additional legal jobs, apply for one of the jobs listed above or just register for email updates for additional job postings as the list is updated.

~Jane Fraytet~

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