Category Archives: collection

How to Find and Use the Library’s Catalog

A recent student survey showed that many students do not know where to find the library’s catalog or how to use it. This blog post is a guide for using ENCORE, the name of the library’s catalog.

How to Find the Catalog

There are several ways to access the catalog.

1. The primary method for student access is to use the Bookmarks on the left side of the page when you log into OrgSync at orgsync.charlottelaw.edu.

catalog12. Another way, appropriate for external patrons such as our library members, is to use the new CSL website. Search for Charlotte School of Law or go to http://www.charlottelaw.edu/.  The library is located under the Academics drop down at the top of the page. There is a button for the catalog under the Search the Collection section.

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How to Use the Catalog
Charlotte School of Law’s online catalog called ENCORE has features that would be helpful for anyone doing research. Although the catalog has a Google-like search box, it also has an Advanced Search option.

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ENCORE supports a basic Boolean search. Searches can be done by Keyword, Title, Author, or Subject. Search limits include Format (Kit, Graphics, Audio CD or Cassette, DVD, EBook, Electronic, Maps, Microform, Printed Material, and Video Tape), Language (English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish), and Publication years. Below is a screen shot of the Advanced Search page.

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Some search tips:

  • An asterisk (*) can be used for right-hand truncation and as a wildcard within a search string. A question mark (?) can be used as a wildcard character, replacing a single letter within a word.
  • Use “and” or “or” or “not” to specify multiple words in any field, any order.
  • Keyword search results are grouped by relevance, bringing the top three most relevant titles to the top of the list. Then ENCORE brings up the top three most relevant articles.
  • If after looking at the results you are interested in a particular format, the different types are listed in the column on the left. The catalog also indicates how many of that type of format are in the catalog. For example, a search on Animal Law shows there are 14 Printed Materials (most often these are books).

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Electronic items can be opened on your computer. The entry for each Printed Material gives information on its availability, location in the library, and call number. For example, Careers in Animal Law is available, located in the Treatises section of the library at KF299.A55 E37 2011.

Because of partnerships between ENCORE and databases like HeinOnline, the search results include articles. HeinOnline is a legal database that contains the full text, PDF of legal documents from most major law reviews and journals. The top three most relevant articles come in this section. Clicking on the PDF button will get to the article.

Advanced features of ENCORE include a “My Research” account which can hold results. The discovery features include Did you mean? A Related Searches (Additional Suggestions) section appears at the bottom left of the search results to help with further searching.

Finally, there are links to other library services such as a form for suggesting purchases, new purchases, and a way to email comments.

If you have any questions about ENCORE, please contact any of the Reference Librarians at libreference@charlottelaw.edu or call 704-971-8573. We are always happy to help.

If you’d like to download a print copy of this post, click here: How to Find and Use the Library.

~Betty Thomas~

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Filed under collection, electronic resources, Information Literacy, Student Information

CSL Library Academic Success Collection Guide

The CSL Library’s Academic Success Collection is located behind the circulation desk on the 5th floor.

This collection includes resources like hornbooks, practice exams, flashcards, audio CDs, and law school success books. Students may browse available titles by subject using the online library catalog, or they can discuss with an Academic Success Counselor which resources might be best suited to their purpose.

The Academic Success Collection contains high-use materials of interest to a large number of students, covering a wide variety of subjects, which is why the materials are on reserve and have limited loan periods. The Academic Success resources are available for a 3 day checkout. Some of the Academic Success resources listed below are also available as a reserve item. Reserve items are limited to a 3 hour checkout.

The following is a general description of the types of Academic Success resources available for each of the 1L classes and for many of the upper level courses:

  • Black Letter Outlines – These outlines summarize the basic black letter rules of each topic in a way that allows students to appreciate how different parts of their course material fit together.
  • Concise Hornbook Series – Discusses specific problems and illustrations, focusing on topics covered in a typical course on civil procedure, tied to no particular casebook.
  • Crunch Time Series – Crunch Times include a summary of about 100 pages, summarizing all the key concepts in easy-to-read outline form, Exam Tips, drawn from analysis of exactly what has been asked on hundreds of past essay and short-answer law exams, Flow Charts short-answer and multiple-choice questions , and complex issue-spotting essay questions. 
  • Emanuel Law Outlines – Emanuel Law Outlines support your class preparation, provide reference for your outline creation, and supply a comprehensive breakdown of topic matter for your entire study process. Also included are exam questions with model answers, an alpha-list of cases, and a cross reference table of cases for all of the leading casebooks.
  • Examples & Explanations – Examples and Explanations are written in clear text and contain many concrete examples as well as questions and answers with detailed explanations for help in reviewing concepts.  Certain legal concepts are explained with the aid of charts and graphics, and sample examination questions are provided with their model answers.
  • Hornbooks – Hornbooks cover a single legal subject and are written expressly for law students by law professors.  These condensed one-volume overviews are written in clear, accessible language.  They contain discussion of courts’ interpretation of the law, explanations of the application of the law today, and may contain hypothetical questions and model answers.  
  • Nutshells – Nutshells are small, paperback texts that present concise overviews of areas of law. Nutshells are considered the most basic secondary source on a legal topic.
  • Q&A Series – These LexisNexis study guide series feature hundreds of multiple-choice and short-answer questions arranged topically, plus an additional sets of questions comprising a final “practice exam.”  For each multiple-choice question, authors provide a detailed answer that indicates which of four options is the best answer and explains thoroughly why that option is better than the other three options. 
  • Siegel’s Series – The Siegel’s Series works through key topics in Q&A format, providing an additional source for self-quizzing. Titles in this exam-prep series contain essay questions with model answers, as well as multiple-choice questions and answers. 
  • Understanding Series – The Understanding the Law series of hornbooks covers the central concepts and issues students encounter in the basic 1L law course, as well as the leading cases.  Topics that typically cause the most confusion are covered in-depth.

Additional Material Types Available from the Library

  • Bar Prep Materials – In the final Stretch? Check out the Bar Prep Materials your library has to offer.
  • Audio CDs – Designed for Audio Learners, or students with long commutes, these convenient audio CD’s present legal topics in a clear, succinct, timesaving format.
  • Flash Cards – For reviewing legal topics point-by-point, Law in a Flash Card Sets contain hundreds of short questions and provide precise answers on the flip side.

~Aaron Greene~

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Filed under Books & Stuff, collection, electronic resources, Libguides, Of Interest to Law Students, Student Information

What ARE Your Favorite Study Aids?

During National Library Week, the library conducted a survey polling our current students about their favorite study aids.

The results have been tallied and sifted through, and we are proud to present the official word on Charlotte Law student’s preferred study aid materials!

Our top five study aids are:

  1. Examples and Explanations – 28.57%
  2. Emanuel Law Outlines – 12.78%
  3. Flash Cards – 12.03%
  4. Black Letter Outlines – 11.28%
  5. Glannon Guides – 10.53%

Here’s the full breakdown:

Want to know why people prefer one type of study aid to another?  We’ve got a graph for that too!


Here’s some of what our students had to say:

“I use The Black Letter Outlines for supplement reading because they provide a solid overview of the specific material and key terms that I should be pulling out of the cases I am assigned.”

“This study aid speaks in regular language. It breaks down concepts to make them very simple to understand (Emanuels).”

“I am an audio learner. It allows me to think visually while I listen to the subject I’m studying (Audio CDs).”

“I’m not one to use study aids, but I like the Examples & Explanations because they’ve been consistently recommended by professors and because they give an opportunity to test your knowledge rather than just rephrasing.”

“I find that most professors suggest this series as a supplement to their teaching. Additionally, I have found that the explanations are very clear and helpful to explain complex theories (Examples & Explanations).”

“The Understanding Series breaks down the subject material in terms in which you will understand it better.”

Want to take a closer look at our study aids collection?  Check out our Academic Success LibGuide, and as always, don’t hesitate to contact the library with additional question or feedback!

~Ashley Moye & Erica Tyler~

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Filed under Books & Stuff, collection, Student Information

I am here to inform you of some of the resources held chaste and secure behind the CIRCULATION DESK.

  • Course Reserves

Voted  the #1 “Subclass of materials you are most likely to know about”, Course Reserves are materials recommended by professors at CSL that you might want to use if you hope to pass the class. They can be checked out for a 3 hour period and if not returned on time, you will be charged $3.00 per hour until the library’s property is returned.

  • Academic Success

Academic Success materials have a long and twisted history that I will not get into at this time; what you need to know is that most of your study guides come from this section.  E&E, Q&A, Emanuel, Horn, Seigel’s, Understanding, Nutshell,  and the almighty FINZ call this section home.  The materials are well loved by students, mostly because they can be checked out for a 3 day period, giving them a chance to actually look over the materials.  Also, late fees for AS materials are $1.00 per day.

  • iPads

That’s right folks – we have iPads! They check out for a 7 day period, and you can even renew them for an extra week. That’s right – an iPad can be yours for two whole weeks. But wait – there’s more!  You are also able to login with your personal apple ID and install any apps you like on your recently checked out iPad. Just make sure to remember that all information will be wiped from the device when the iPads is returned to the library

Be sure to return your iPad before the due date to save yourself from some hefty fees. No shipping and handling. For more information on iPads, or how to catch a monkey using salt, visit the circulation desk at your local law library. Roll credits. Infomercial over.

  • Professor Binder

This item isn’t really behind the circulation desk.  It is actually on the circulation desk.  On display next to the general office supplies you find at circulation, you will find The Professor Binder. The Professor Binder contains professor’s contact information, required textbooks for their course, and suggested study aids. This is a great new resource for students – on your next visit to circulation give it a glace.

  • Course Reserve Permanent

CRP are materials that were on reserve for a previous class but have been deemed worthy of permanent reserve status. Many of the study aides found in AS are also held for you in CRP.   CRP books check out for 3 hours and $3.00 late fees apply.   These materials are mostly treated as a last resort for students cramming for a midterm or final exam when all of the Academic Success materials have been checked out.

  • Flash Cards

Some of you may not know that deep in the bowels of the circulation desk, flash cards covering a variety of subjects await.  The flash cards are a part of the Academic Success materials and can be checked out for three days and also have the $1.00 a day late fees.  (And let it be known that this is the only kind of flashing allowed in the library)

  • Audio Study Aids

Audio Study Aids mostly consist of lectures on one given subject of law.  Academic Success audio study aids check out for 3 days, and late fees are $1 per day.  It is safe to say that you should never listen to these while driving and tired. (I almost injured myself this way because of a long winded and somewhat boring Stephen King novel.)

  • Study room Kit and Headphones

Does your study room need a little color? Do you like the idea of earmuffs that project sound? Is the square root of 49 equal to 7? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then the circulation desk should be your next destination.  Each study room kit contains dry erase markers, a dry erase eraser and dry erase board spray.  Each headphone kit contains…uh… a set of headphones.  These items can be checked out any time the circulation desk is open and must be returned before the desk closes for the night.

  • Video Cables

We have a plethora (that’s right, I said it) of video out cables at the circulation desk. We have iMac, iPad, iPhone, Lightning, VGA, and HDMI video out cables.  When I read that list only one word comes to my mind. PLETHORA.  These cables also checkout for the day and must be returned before the circulation desk closes.

Thank you very much for reading!

~Aaron Greene~

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by | May 13, 2014 · 8:00 am

A Study in Environmental Activism

Stand Up That Mountain: The Battle to Save One Small Community in the Wilderness along the Appalachian Trail  by Jay Erskine Leutze.

Stand Up That Mountain: The Battle to Save One Small Community in the Wilderness along the Appalachian Trail by Jay Erskine Leutze.

For anyone who loves the North Carolina mountains, the Appalachian Trail, the Blue Ridge Parkway, the Great Smoky Mountains… this is an all too familiar story. Jay Erskine Leutze’s first book is his account of the battle against a large gravel mine set to take down Belview Mountain in Avery County, North Carolina. Not only was the largest surface mine in the South to be located adjacent to homes in the small community of Dog Patch but also within close view of the Appalachian Trail, a federally protected park.

Jay Erskine Leutze is a non-practicing lawyer who graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After law school, Leutze retreated to an “intentional” quiet life in Avery County intending to write, fish and hike. His quiet life ended in 1999 with a test blast that shook his home and a call from fourteen-year-old Ashley Cox that got him involved in a legal battle against Paul Brown and the Clark Stone Company. The case became known at the Putnam Mine case.

This book is the story of Leutze’s four year campaign that started with pulling together a legal defense team to a landmark decision upheld by the North Carolina Supreme Court. Along the way, his legal team partnered with advocacy groups such as the Southern Environmental Law Center, the Appalachian Trail Conference, and the National Parks Conservation Association to oppose the mine. In an ironic twist, they were also drawn into supporting the State of North Carolina as the state Division of Land Resources revoked Brown’s ninety-nine year mining permit, an unprecedented decision. The story clearly shows the twists and turns of multiple court battles as the case goes through the legal process.

Just as the case meanders through the court system, Leutze’s story fleshes out the importance of the area, describing in detail the scenic aspects of the mountains and the history of various parts and people like Sugar Top, a condominium complex built on the top of Sugar Mountain that resulted in North Carolina’s landmark Mountain Ridge Protection Act. Leutze’s humble tone and passion for the cause makes this an unusually attractive story. Here is a true guide to environmental advocacy.

landscape

 

~Betty Thomas~

Note:  Stand Up That Mountain has been added the Charlotte Law Library’s collection and is available for check out.

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Filed under Book Reviews - The Stranger the Better, Books & Stuff, collection, Of Interest to Law Students