ALR Student’s Corner: FBI Website: Where the Crime Is

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The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is an agency set-up to protect and defend the United States against terrorist and foreign intelligence threats, uphold and enforce the criminal laws of the United States, and provide leadership within the criminal justice system. The FBI’s main website, at http://www.fbi.gov/, offers the user many link options to its various law enforcement functions.

The FBI Crime Statistics page offers the user a wealth of statistical information with the annual Uniform Crime Reports, at http://www.fbi.gov/stats-services/crimestats.  But one does not need to be a statistician to appreciate the information; the web page is easy to understand and navigate, even for a novice.  The Uniform Crime Report is the FBI’s most comprehensive analysis of violent crime and property crime in the United States, compiling the volume and rate of criminal offenses at the national and state and, in some instances, county and municipal levels. Statistics reflecting arrests, clearance, and law enforcement employee data are also included.     The statistical presentation and analysis of the Report breaks down into such topics as Annual Crime Stats, Hate Crime Statistics, Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted (LEOKA), The National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS), Bank Crime Reports, Internet Crime Reports, National Gang Threat Assessments, and Terrorism Incidents.

With the Uniform Crime Reports, criminologists, students, or the merely interested can locate statistics according to such categories as types of crime, victims of crime, perpetrators of crime, and location of crime.  For example, if a user were interested in hate crime statistics for 2011, she would click on the link for “2011” under the “Hate Crime Statistics” section of the Uniform Crime Reports web page.  This will take the user to the 2011 Hate Crime Statistics page, where she can browse narrower topical categories related to the hate crimes committed in 2011, including the following: Incidents and Offenses, Victims, Offenders, Location and Type, and Hate Crime by Jurisdiction.  Within the “Location and Type” category, for instance, the user can then scroll through and select from a list of subcategories – racial bias, religious bias, sexual-orientation bias, ethnicity/national origin bias, disability bias, and multiple-bias incidents – to find particular percentages for a type of hate crime reported and where.

Additionally, on the 2011 Hate Crimes page, as on those of the other crime categories, there are fourteen tables that represent different statistical charts or data sets, such as 1) Incidents, Offenses, Victims, and Known Offenders, by Bias Motivation; 2) Offenses, Known Offender’s Race, by Offense Type; 3) Offenses, Victim Type, by Offense Type; 4) Incidents, Bias Motivation, by Location; and 5) Agency Hate Crime Reporting by State.  These easy-access table and chart links enable the user to refine her search to more specific statistical information regarding hate crimes.

With the FBI crime statistics web site, a user can find many statistics for many areas of crime. The need to cull crime statistics may propose an unpleasant commentary about our society; however, it is encouraging to know there is an organization like the FBI dedicated to lowering these statistics.

~ Kevin Miller, L’15 ~

Class Advisor – Cory M. Lenz, Esq.

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Filed under Advanced Legal Research, Library

Where Are They Now? The Law Library Checks in with Alumnus Joshua W. Goodman

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Joshua W. Goodman, Charlotte Law Alumnus & Managing Attorney at Fisher Law Group, PLLC

The Charlotte Law Library checks in with one of our alumni, Joshua E. Goodman, and asks him a few questions about life after law school …

What was the biggest adjustment after graduating from law school?

Finding my niche in the legal market has taken far more time than I would have thought. I came out of law school with one expectation for where my career would go and as I have practiced that track has changed significantly.

Not to terrify all of the current law students, but I find I have much less free time now than I did in law school.

How have the skills acquired in law school assisted you?

Practicing law and managing a law office takes a lot of discipline and dedication. The practical skills taught in law school are necessary to acquire a license to practice law, but the ability to wear each of the “hats” required in running a law office has been a much more beneficial skill set. Law school provided me with the challenge of managing a heavy class load, along with multiple semester-long externships/internships, a part-time job at the law school library, and a personal life. This balancing act has made the transition from law school to practicing attorney much more manageable.

What class came in most handy?

Trial Practice and Advanced Legal Research. Every student who wishes to work in litigation knows to take a Trial Practice/Advocacy class; however, legal research has turned out to be the most useful class I had the privilege of taking in law school. It has allowed me to take advantage of the resources available, which cuts down on the time spent while providing a greater return on my time.

What are you doing now?

I am a managing Partner at Fisher Law Group, PLLC. I focus my practice primarily on Family Law and Collaborative Divorce work, but I do represent clients in Criminal and Juvenile Delinquency cases as well.

What database or print resource have you found most useful in your current career path?

Taking advantage of Westlaw at the Law School Library and Fastcase (offered through the NC Bar Association) have been the most helpful database resources. I also use a multitude of print resources including books saved from law school, general guides and treatises, as well as a significant number of educational books authored by psychologists and attorneys specifically related to family law issues.

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Filed under Careers, Library, Where Are They Now?

Where Are They Now? The Law Library Checks in with Alumnus Joshua W. Goodman

Fisher_LawGroup-20

Joshua W. Goodman, Charlotte Law Alumnus & Managing Attorney at Fisher Law Group, PLLC

The Charlotte Law Library checks in with one of our alumni, Joshua E. Goodman, and asks him a few questions about life after law school …

What was the biggest adjustment after graduating from law school?

Finding my niche in the legal market has taken far more time than I would have thought. I came out of law school with one expectation for where my career would go and as I have practiced that track has changed significantly.

Not to terrify all of the current law students, but I find I have much less free time now than I did in law school.

How have the skills acquired in law school assisted you?

Practicing law and managing a law office takes a lot of discipline and dedication. The practical skills taught in law school are necessary to acquire a license to practice law, but the ability to wear each of the “hats” required in running a law office has been a much more beneficial skill set. Law school provided me with the challenge of managing a heavy class load, along with multiple semester-long externships/internships, a part-time job at the law school library, and a personal life. This balancing act has made the transition from law school to practicing attorney much more manageable.

What class came in most handy?

Trial Practice and Advanced Legal Research. Every student who wishes to work in litigation knows to take a Trial Practice/Advocacy class; however, legal research has turned out to be the most useful class I had the privilege of taking in law school. It has allowed me to take advantage of the resources available, which cuts down on the time spent while providing a greater return on my time.

What are you doing now?

I am a managing Partner at Fisher Law Group, PLLC. I focus my practice primarily on Family Law and Collaborative Divorce work, but I do represent clients in Criminal and Juvenile Delinquency cases as well.

What database or print resource have you found most useful in your current career path?

Taking advantage of Westlaw at the Law School Library and Fastcase (offered through the NC Bar Association) have been the most helpful database resources. I also use a multitude of print resources including books saved from law school, general guides and treatises, as well as a significant number of educational books authored by psychologists and attorneys specifically related to family law issues.

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Filed under Careers, Library, Where Are They Now?

Sports Law — Practice in Context

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Associate Professor Jonathan Fine’s Sports Law–Practice in Context class field trip (Apr 17, 2015)

On April 17, 2015, Charlotte Law’s “Sports Law — Practice in Context” class had the opportunity to tour the BB&T Ballpark and then held class in the club lounge. Earlier in the semester, the class worked on negotiation and drafting of certain provisions of a typical ballpark lease agreements.  The idea behind the tour was to give the students a hands-on view of some of the operational aspects of those lease agreements.

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Filed under Events, General Charlotte School of Law Information

Links We Love Weekly Round-Up — April 27, 2015

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World Book Day: 10 Most Beautiful Libraries around the World

World Book Day, celebrated on 23 April by UNESCO, marks the anniversaries of the deaths of William Shakespeare and the author Miguel de Cervantes. First observed in 1995, the date has been marked as a celebration of books and the cultural wealth reading provides. In celebration of the day, here are some of the most beautiful libraries in the world, both modern and ancient, from a tiny library covered in firewood to an all-white building inspired by the Pantheon of ancient Rome.

From Law School to Practice: Meeting Employer Expectations

In a recent paper, Professors Chew and Pryal, University of North Carolina School of Law, identified areas where legal employers’ expectations concerning law students and recent graduates diverge.

The Net Neutrality Order has Hit the Federal Register!

Get your calendars out. It’s time to calculate the date by which petitions for judicial review of the FCC’s Open Internet Report and Order (R&O) must be filed. That’s because the event that triggers that calculation – publication of the R&O in the Federal Register – has now occurred.  Petitions for review of this kind of FCC proceeding are due to be filed within 60 days of the release of the agency decision. The date of “release” is the date of Federal Register publication, i.e., April 13. That means that petitions for review of theR&O by a federal appeals court must be filed no later than June 12, 2015. BUT if you’ve got your heart set on having the appeal heard by a particular circuit, you should definitely NOT wait until the last minute.

How to Promote Your Blog Effectively [Infographic]

In digital marketing, there is always a new trend, a new technology or a new way of thinking to take into account. But there is still a place for the humble blog. An infographic from Referral Candy provides tips from top marketing experts to improve your blog, and more importantly to promote your blog effectively.

Quitting as a Productivity Tactic

Check your to do list. See that one item? The one that’s been there for weeks? Before you beat yourself up about how yet again, you haven’t done something you’ve been dreading, ask yourself the question: Do I really need to do this?

Infographics Make the Complex Simple for a Jury, Presenter Says

There are few things in litigation more difficult than making the complex simple, says veteran trial lawyer Randy Juip, a partner at the Livonia, Mich., firm Foley, Baron, Metzger & Juip, but it’s part of a trial lawyer’s job.  And the best way to do that, Juip said in an ABA Techshow presentation Friday on Data, Logic, and Persuasion: the Analysis and Presentation of Complex Data to a Lay Audience, is to use infographics that will effectively illustrate your data without confusing the jury.

Takaharu Tezuka: The Best Kindergarten You’ve Ever Seen

At this school in Tokyo, five-year-olds cause traffic jams and windows are for Santa to climb into. Meet: the world’s cutest kindergarten, designed by architect Takaharu Tezuka. In this charming talk, he walks us through a design process that really lets kids be kids.

Rescued Cat Nurses Sick Animals Back to Health

A cat that was saved from dying on the streets of Poland has now become a “nurse” to other animals in the shelter, Central European News (CEN) reported.

Young Gun

In 1882, Sheriff Pat Garrett published his account of the apprehension and death of Billy the Kid, whom he shot and killed on July 14, 1881.  “‘The Kid’ had a lurking devil in him; it was a good-humored, jovial imp, or a cruel and blood-thirsty fiend, as circumstances prompted. Circumstances favored the worser angel, and ‘The Kid’ fell,” Garrett wrote in “The Authentic Life of Billy, the Kid.”  Marshal Ashmun Upson, a friend of Garrett who was also a newspaper journalist, actually ghostwrote the book.

Your Assignment: Host a Campus Wide Event (Libraries and Active Learning)

As a follow-up to my post last week about our seven classrooms, I wanted to quickly share an example of how we are impacting teaching and learning.

Managing Expectations

Finding appropriate work-life balance seems to be a never-ending quest in many lines of work, and academia is no exception. It’s all too easy to work far too late into the evening, grading, preparing classes, or (everyone’s favorite!) answering email.

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Filed under Library, Weekly Round Up